Whole Food Plant-Based Nutrition May Positively Impact Pulmonary Hypertension, Improve Sexual Function in Women and Reverse Blindness Related to Diabetic Retinopathy

 

Whole Food Plant-Based Nutrition May Positively Impact Pulmonary Hypertension, Improve Sexual Function in Women and Reverse Blindness Related to Diabetic Retinopathy

 

In the second edition of the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention (IJDRP), evidence is presented that a whole food plant-based dietary lifestyle may positively impact the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension, reverse type 2 diabetes, reverse blindness resulting from diabetic retinopathy, and decrease symptoms of female sexual dysfunction.

Also published is an argument challenging The American College of Cardiology's (ACC) and the American Heart Association's (AHA) recent classification of Class IIa, LOE BR guidance to limit processed meats, refined carbohydrates, sweetened beverages, cholesterol, sodium, and saturated fat, despite data suggestiong their cardiovascular harm. 

Finally, there are submissions suggesting that improving dietary lifestyle may have an impact in reducing healthcare costs, as well as a guide for implementing plant-based nutrition in a hospital setting.

According to the CDC, almost 60% of the American population suffers from at least one chronic illness - such illnesses are the leading factor in the nation's $3.3 trillion healthcare costs - and so it is evident that a new approach to managing chronic disease is needed.

“I am encouraged by the high-quality submissions received in the inaugural year of the IJDRP.” Says IJDRP editor-in-chief Kim A. Williams, Sr., MD, MACC, FAH, MASNC, FESC. “The breadth and quality of materials published shed light on the power of plant-based nutrition to positively impact the treatment of an array of chronic illnesses for generations to come.”

Also of note, is the incorporation of the International Journal of Lifestyle Medicine into the IJDRP, which comes as a result of a strategic partnership between the IJDRP and the Lifestyle Medicine Global Alliance (LMGA).

We look forward to reaching broad global audiences as a result of our partnership with the LMGA.” says Scott Stoll, MD, board chairman and co-founder of The Plantrician Project, “Future editions of the IJDRP will incorporate the International Journal of Lifestyle Medicine into every issue.”

Finally, also published today, is the second issue of the Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest, a companion publication to the IJDRP that links the disease reversing science of the IJDRP, whole food plant-based nutrition and regenerative agriculture with practical advice for living a vibrant, healthy life.

The International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention and The Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest are special projects of The Plantrician Project. The Plantrician Project is a 501c3 not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing educational events, tools and resources for healthcare practitioners and those they serve. For more information, visit http://www.plantricianproject.org

 

 

 

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