Oxytocin - The 'Love Hormone' - Can Also Make You Jealous

The 'Love Hormone' - Oxytocin - Can Also Make You Jealous

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A study from the University of Haifa has thrown some cold water on the notion of the hormone oxytocin as purely and simply being the "love hormone".

Oxytocin is released during sexual relationships and naturally during childbirth.

It has previously been found to positively affect our behaviour in the areas of altruism, trust, empathy and generosity, but this new study shows that it also has identifiable affects on less positive behavioural traits, such as jealousy and gloating.

The lead researcher, Simone Shamay-Tsoory, explains:

"We assume that the hormone is an overall trigger for social sentiments: when the person's association is positive, oxytocin bolsters pro-social behaviours; when the association is negative, the hormone increases negative sentiments."

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