Introducing Cuddle Therapy

 

Introducing Cuddle Therapy

 


Nordic Cuddle is delighted to be the first company to accredit a cuddle therapy course with The CMA. In doing so, The CMA has brought onboard a new form of touch-therapy which is growing in popularity around the world.

Cuddle therapy is a platonic touch therapy, which incorporates hugs, hand-holding, gentle arm rubs and back massages. Some of the reasons clients go for cuddle therapy sessions include stress, loneliness and anxiety amongst many others. By receiving touch, clients can feel calmer, less stressed and more grounded within themselves. 

Nordic Cuddle provides a platform connecting trained and DBS-checked practitioners with clients. We also provide one of the first dual-accredited cuddle therapy training courses in the world, having been accredited by the CMA and the International Council for Online Educational Standards (ICOES).

Our course has contributions from leading touch research and medical experts, who make up our new medical and wellness advisory board. These experts include Professor Kory Floyd, Dr. Juulia Suvilehto, Dr. Emilia Vuorisalmi and Dr. Liliya Wheatcraft. We’re also delighted to include additional contributions from Dr. Betty Martin and Deb Dana about The Wheel of Consent and the Polyvagal Theory.

Nordic Cuddle is also passionate about raising the profile of the industry, which is why we’re delighted to hold full Training School Membership with The CMA.

Our course is comprised of an online theory element (£129) and a separate practical element (additional cost of £110). In our course, you’ll discover how to conduct a session, how to stay safe, how to maintain boundaries and consent, and you’ll also gain an understanding of why touch is so important for our wellbeing. We’re delighted to offer £30 discount off the theory element for CMA members during the month of July, using the code cmajuly30 at checkout. Find out more and purchase here.

 

News

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