Hypericum

HYPERICUM (Hypericum perfoliatum)

 

In medieval times the hanging of St John's wort or hypericum (Greek for 'over an apparition') in one's home was believed to ward off evil spirits.

 

Hypericum is more commonly known as St John's wort, a name linking the plant to the 29th of August, the alleged anniversary of St John the Baptist's execution, as well as an being an ancient order of knights known as the knights of St John the Baptist.

 

Other names: St John's wort.

 

Description and places it grows in: This plant can grow up to three feet in height, with long, oval dark green leaves that appear to be covered in black spots (although in reality they are glands that secrete a blood-red oil). It has large, bright yellow flowers that bloom in the summer months. Hypericum is native to Britain, Europe and Asia.

 

Parts used: The whole fresh green plant and flowers.

 

Homeopaths may prescribe this remedy for:

 

Nerve damage/pain following an accident especially relating to the spine, head, eye, fingers and toes displaying the following symptoms: Shooting/stabbing pains, radiating upwards;

 

Wounds/cuts displaying the following symptoms: Stabbing pains (an indication of nerve damage).

 

Bites and stings

 

Toothache and post-tooth extraction pain

 

Asthma

 

Digestive problems displaying the following symptoms: Indigestion; sickness; diarrhoea.

 

People requiring this remedy will feel worse: In cold, damp or foggy weather; prior to a storm; undressing in a cold room; when touched; in a closed, stuffy room.

 

People requiring this remedy will feel better: Standing still; tilting their head backwards.

 

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