Coalition Issues International Consensus on Testosterone Treatment for Women

 

Coalition Issues International Consensus on Testosterone Treatment for Women

 

The Endocrine Society and 10 other internationally esteemed medical societies have today issued the first Global Position Statement on the use of testosterone in the treatment of women. The statement was published in four leading international medical journals and has been authored by a diverse team of leading experts based around the world.

It follows years of debate regarding testosterone therapy for women and, for the first time, provides agreement among experts and medical societies about how testosterone could be prescribed for women.

“This position statement has far reaching global consequences. It not only reassures clinicians that a trial of testosterone therapy is appropriate for women with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Dysfunction (HSDD), but very emphatically states that, at present, the available evidence does not support the use of testosterone for any other symptoms or medical condition,” said co-author Susan Ruth Davis, F.R.A.C.P.,Ph.D.,M.B.B.S., of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. “It also clearly advises that when testosterone therapy is given, the resultant blood levels should not be above those seen in healthy young women. We hope this will allow women who may benefit to be offered treatment, and simultaneously protect women from receiving inappropriate testosterone therapy.”

An international task force of experts from leading medical societies, brought together by the International Menopause Society, produced the Global Position Statement to provide clear guidance regarding the prescribing and measurement of testosterone for female testosterone therapy as well as advice on testosterone prescribing practices that have the potential to be ineffectual or cause harm.

They concluded that testosterone can be effective at improving sexual wellbeing for postmenopausal women with HSDD. Recognized benefits included improved sexual desire, arousal, orgasm and pleasure, together with reduced concerns and distress about sex.

HSDD is thought to affect around 32 percent of women at midlife; and, while it's common for women to lose interest in sex around the time of the menopause and after, the use of testosterone as a treatment offers women an approach that may significantly improve their sexual and related emotional wellbeing.

The international panel is calling on industry, researchers and funding organizations to recognize the need for further research into testosterone therapy for women of all ages and the development and licensing of products formulated specifically for women.

The statement was developed by a multinational, multidisciplinary task force, the members of which were delegates from leading medical societies, and was peer reviewed by expert committees of endorsing societies from across the world. It has been translated into 13 languages and aims to improve the sexual wellbeing of women on a global scale.

Source

Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions.

The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.

 

Small Units Help People Eat More Veggies

Small Units Help People Eat More Veggies

Researchers at the University of Georgia have examined the
psychology of how vegetables are presented and served, and

It May Be Possible To Avoid Developing Dementia

Can you spot the difference? Neither can your immune system.

Your Heart's Best Friend: Dog Ownership Associated with Better Cardiovascular Health

Your Heart's Best Friend: Dog Ownership Associated with Better Cardiovascular Health

Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if
that pet is a dog, according to the first analysis of data from the

Study Explores Effects of Harp Music on ICU Patients

Air Pollution Contributes Significantly to Diabetes Globally

News

A study published in January 2019 has revealed that the bacteria that cause gingivitis may also be connected to Alzheimer's disease.

It is unclear if implanted devices are safe from hackers.

The implication of the human microbiome in disease has been suspected on and off for a long time and sayings passed on from generation to generation like “you are what you eat”, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”, going back to dates BC, when Hippocrates was quoted to say “all disease begins in the gut”.

A new study discovered that using mouthwash can prevent exercise from lowering your blood pressure as it normally does.

The COMPLEMENTARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (The CMA) © 2012. No part of this site may be reproduced without the express permission of The Complementary Medical Association. If used without prior consent a charge of US $1,000 per article, or mini section is paid (US $50 per word (minimum) will be charged. This is not meant to reflect a commercial rate for the content, but as a punitive cost and to reimburse The CMA for legal fees and time costs). Use of the contents, without permission will be taken as consent to bill the illegal user in full.