Herpes: Can Mugwort Treat It?

Can Mugwort Treat Herpes?

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A study published in Phytotherapy Research looks at the role Tansy – “Golden Buttons”, or “Mugwort” – can play in treating herpes.

Tansy has been used as a traditional remedy for hundreds of years to treat fevers,  rheumatism, digestive problems, to heal sores, and measles.

Interestingly in the Middle Ages it was also used to help women with infertility problems as well as – in high doses – to induce abortions.

The study by scientists from the Universities of Greenwich (UK) and Oviedo (Spain) show that it might now be useful in treating herpes.

Lead researcher Professor Parra explained “ Our research focused on the anti-viral properties of tansy, especially the potential treatment it may represent for herpes,....(as).... we currently lack an effective vaccine for either HSV-1 or HSV-2 stands of the disease, which can cause long term infections. Our study revealed tansy does contains known antiviral agents including 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA) as well as axillarin, which contributes to its antiherpetic effect. This shows that multiple properties of the plant are responsible for the supposed antiviral activity of tansy.”

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