Ayurveda can play a significant role in the fight against coronavirus, says a seasoned medical professor

 

Ayurveda can play a significant role in the fight against coronavirus, says a seasoned medical professor

 

Dr Bhaswati Bhattacharya, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine from Weill Cornell Medical College, has stated that Ayurveda may have a place in the fight against COVID-19.

According to Dr Bhattacharya, practicing Ayurveda is like approaching the disease from the perspective of air, water, land and time.

"This is elaborated in a chapter on epidemics known as janapada-uddhvansa in ancient classic medical texts. The daily lifestyle of a survivor includes cleaning the air, using clean water properly, cleansing the land, and becoming aware of time," Bhattacharya said.

She also said that Ayurveda does not focus on the virus, but the person.

"It focuses on the person, the host. Every seed that can grow will not grow in every soil. Ayurvedic wisdom says to empower the soil of the body so that the virus cannot take hold. This is pure personalised medicine at its best," she emphasised.

The Ministry of AYUSH in India has proposed to include Ayurveda solutions in the district level contingency plans being drawn up to contain COVID-19 in all districts across the country.

Bhattacharya added that cleansing the air can include fumigation and burning of herbs, particularly those with anti-viral properties.

"Burned ajwain is used in eye remedies and can be used in a dhoopana, along with neem, haldi, garlic and onion peels, and coconut husk. Opening doors and windows in the morning after rising brings in fresh air allows concentrated particles to leave," she said.

Keeping the land clean requires removing waste, planting trees, leaving water and food out for birds, and ensuring the space breathes clean air. The awareness of time is developed by meditation, yoga, and the appreciation of quiet and calm.

"During pandemics, people who are not mentally resilient require extra assistance, breaking down with low thresholds for trauma and showing poor stress management," Bhattacharya said.

Ayurveda also offers guidelines for food during epidemics, and stresses that we should keep our bodies clean by eating simple, healthy foods, and foods that do not disrespect the environment. Bhattacharya recommends shifting towards a plant-based diet.

"Guduchi/giloy (Tinospora cordifolia) is the best plant for boosting immunity during this pandemic and is found in many forms," she said.

According to her, Ayurveda is not a chemistry-based science. "It includes ecology, geology, biology, botany, and many other modern sciences which are disconnected. Trusting Ayurveda as an overall approach is trusting that all sciences are deeply connected," said Bhattacharya who hold a Ph.D in Ayurveda from Banaras Hindu University and has been affiliated with Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Wyckoff Heights Medical Center.

 

https://weather.com/en-IN/india/coronavirus/news/2020-04-27-ayurveda-can-play-significant-role-fight-against-coronavirus

 

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