Mens Health

Eco-Atkins Low-carb Vegan Diet Provides Huge Health Benefits
"Eco-Atkins" Low-carb Vegan Diet Provides Huge Health Benefits

"Eco-Atkins" Low-carb Vegan Diet Provides Huge Health Benefits

Vitamin D has been linked to reducing the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in children.
Vitamin D has been linked to reducing the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in children.

Vitamin D has been linked to reducing the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in children. A Finnish study monitoring over 12,000 babies born in 1966 showed that those given the correct amount of vitamin D supplement had an 80% decreased risk of developing diabetes. It was also found that children with rickets-which is linked to a vitamin D deficiency-, stood three times the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Children who consume substantial amounts of fatty fish appear less likely to develop diabetes. Vitamin D is also made in response to UVB sun rays and this has been the main source of this hormone-like nutrient.

Vegans Have Low Omega 3 - But No Lower than Omnivores
Vegans Have Low Omega 3 - But No Lower than Omnivores

The omega-3 index of vegans is low, but no lower than the levels measured in omnivores, says a new study, which also supports the efficacy of an algal-derived omega-3 supplement to boost EPA and DHA levels. Data from 165 vegans indicated that their omega-3 index was about 3.7%, which was similar to those measured in omnivores, report scientists from the University of San Diego, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of South Dakota and OmegaQuant Analytics. The omega-3 index is a measure of the fatty acid levels in red blood cells, and reflects long-term intake of EPA and DHA. It was first proposed in 2004 as a “novel, physiologically relevant, easily modified, independent, and graded risk factor for death from CHD” (Prev Med . Vol. 39, pp. 212-20.) “We conclude that a majority of long-term vegans appear to be relatively deficient in DHA and EPA, but whether this leads to adverse health consequences is unclear,” wrote the researcher in Clinical Nutrition .

Do Vegans and Vegetarians Really Live Longer, Healthier Lives?
Do Vegans and Vegetarians Really Live Longer, Healthier Lives?

Do Vegans and Vegetarians Really Live Longer, Healthier Lives? An article in the International Journal of Epidemiology published the results of the Adventist Health Study 2 - a huge piece of researdh that began in 1960 and has continued since then. In the study 96,000 Seventh Day Adventists were asked to complete and in-depth 50 page questionnaire (see the questionnaire here) which looked at a vast range of health markers and indications. Why were Seventh Day Adventists used for this study? The Adventist church, of 24 million adherents world-wide, promotes a healthy lifestyle. Church members are expected to be non-smokers and non-alcohol users, and are encouraged to eat a vegetarian diet. Many also avoid caffeine-containing beverages. However, adherence to these recommendations is quite variable. So far - all the indications are that a healthy vegan or vegetarian diet is one of the main the keys to living a long and healthy life - which is great news as all the trends indicate that people who follow a standard Westernised diet and lifestyle are much more likely to develop chronic, devastating health conditions at increasingly younger ages. These health conditions include heart and cardio-vascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes and the complications thereof, most cancers, neurological disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and a wide range of conditions which have inflammation as their underlying causative factor.

Can Viscum album (Mistletoe) Homeopathic Medicine Reduce Blood Pressure?
Can Viscum album (Mistletoe) Homeopathic Medicine Reduce Blood Pressure?

Can Viscum album (Mistletoe) Homeopathic Medicine Reduce Blood Pressure? A Pilot Study has been published in the Journal of Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine which looks at a rarely used homeopathic remedy - and it's use in treating hypertension. Interestingly the medicine that was given to the patients was a preparation of Mistletoe - which has a long history of use throughout Europe, Asia and Africa - and has traditionally been used as a cardiac medication. The researchers found that the Mistletoe extract lowered blood pressure safely and that it also lowered serum triglycerides. The researchers comment that they would like to see Mistletoe extract being used to treat high blood pressure in future, both on it's own and in conjunction with conventional medicines where appropriate.

Perceived Stress in Multiple Sclerosis and The Potential Role of Mindfulness in Health and Well-Being
Perceived Stress in Multiple Sclerosis and The Potential Role of Mindfulness in Health and Well-Being

Perceived Stress in Multiple Sclerosis and The Potential Role of Mindfulness in Health and Well-Being Stressful life events are associated with worsening neurological symptoms and decreased quality of life in multiple sclerosis (MS). Mindful consciousness can alter the impact of stressful events and has potential to improve health outcomes in MS.

Complementary Medical approaches to decreasing discomfort during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL)
Complementary Medical approaches to decreasing discomfort during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL)

Complementary approaches to decreasing discomfort during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Complementary Medical approaches including Acupuncture, TENS and Music Therapy have been at the centre of a recent trial to see if these therapies can help people suffering from kidney stones. It was discovered that Complementary Therapies can lower patients need for pain killers and it was also noted that their anxiety levels decreased too.

Why Do We Kiss? - Its not what you think!
Why Do We Kiss? - Its not what you think!

Why Do We Kiss? Its not what you think! Examining the possible functions of kissing in romantic relationships.

Men's Health

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