Omega-3 Rich Diets Help to Fend Off Alzheimer’s; But Beware Exercise!

Omega-3 Rich Diets Help to Fend Off Alzheimer’s; But Beware Exercise!

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Preliminary results from research undertaken at Tel Aviv University (Department of Neurobiology ) on mice, indicate that a diet high in Omega 3 oils and low in cholesterol appears to significantly reduce the negative effects of one of the five key molecules known to affect or cause Alzheimer’s - the APOE4 gene.

But, as with most medical or dietary conditions there appear to be both ‘good’ and ‘bad’ variants of this APOE gene

In differentiating between these variants of the APOE gene, the researchers looked at the role that exercise plays.

They found that “while a rich and stimulating environment (including exercise – from running wheels, etc) is good for carriers of "good" APOE, the same stimulating environment has a negative effect on those at risk for Alzheimer's because they carry a different variation of the gene - the APOE4 gene.”

So whereas a ‘stimulating’ environment helped new neuronal connections form in the brain where the ‘good’ APOE gene was present – it had the opposite effect (killing brain neurons) where the "bad APOE" gene existed.

The lead researcher went on to hypothesize that: "Extrapolating this to the human population, individuals with the bad APOE4 gene are more susceptible to stress caused by an environment that stimulates their brain."

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