Herbalism

HERBALISM

General Guidelines

What is Herbalism?

What to expect when you visit a therapist

History (in brief)

What is herbalism?

Many of the pharmaceutical drugs we use in this day and age are derived from herbs. However, these drugs are based on what are considered to be the plant's 'active' ingredients (e.g. certain chemicals that have been isolated from the original plant), whereas herbalism utilises the whole plant, or at the very least the seed, root or flower.

It is believed that these so-called 'inactive' ingredients play a significant role in determining the herbs overall therapeutic effect. It is also felt that although some herbs do have side effects, those caused by herbal preparations are far less severe than the reactions experienced when taking pharmaceutical drugs.

Herbalism, like all forms of complementary medicine, treats the person as a whole, believing that the body has its own "vital force" (an ability to heal itself). Herbs help support this system, enabling it to restore balance (homeostasis) in the body.

Main uses

All physical and some mental/emotional disorders.

Click here to find out what to expect when you visit a herbalist.

Click here for information on how to find a herbalist.

Holly

Holly

Holly is most often used in complementary medicine in the
form of a Bach (correctly pronounced “batch”) Flower Remedy.

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News

Ivy

Ivy

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Ivy is used in herbal medicine. It is a bitter aromatic herb which has an emetic effect and a nauseating taste. Over the millennia, it has been used as a handy folk remedy - particularly in the treatment of rheumatism and also as an external application to skin eruptions, swollen and painful joints, burns and suppurating cuts.

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