Are there any remedies for bad breath?

Bad Breath

Are there any remedies for bad breath?

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It is important to not only treat the symptoms but to address the cause. Bad breath can be the result of variety of problems.

We all know that certain foods can cause bad breath such as garlic or onions. Another very common reason for bad breath is gum disease, known as gingivitis. Sinus problems can also be a cause and so too can sluggish bowels i.e. constipation.

Remedies

Take charcoal if your bad breath is the result of a sluggish bowel, as the charcoal will absorb the toxins. You might like to take chlorophyll, which is the green pigment in plants and is renowned for its deodorising properties. It can be taken either in a liquid form and added to water or in the form of a capsule.

This herb neutralises the acids in the body and also helps cleanse the bowel. Waste materials that are stuck in the bowel area can cause the smell.

Alternatively, add two drops of peppermint essential oil and 2 drops of Lemon essential oil to a teaspoon of brandy and then add this to a cup of water and use as a mouthwash. Do not swallow the solution.

Check with your dentist to see if you have gingivitis and if so use myrrh in a mouthwash. Avoid this herb if you are pregnant.

Dab your tongue with peppermint oil to mask smell until the herbs start to work.

Many people with gingivitis are deficient in Vitamin C so take supplements if this is the case.

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